Interested in helping us understand and protect the lands and waters of Kachemak Bay? We want to partner with you! There are many ways to engage.

Monitor

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Monitor

Do you enjoy being outside on the coasts? Transform the activities you love into important work by becoming a community monitor. You’ll receive the training you need and contribute to a long-term data set that is helping protect the people and places of Kachemak Bay. Here’s how:

Keep tabs on HABs: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are a threat to marine mammals, birds, fisheries, mariculture operations, and people! Thanks to the HABs Community Monitoring Program, we track whether toxic phytoplankton are present in Kachemak Bay and make that information available to everyone who needs it to protect public health. As a volunteer, you’ll collect water samples at a monitoring site near you and give them to the Reserve for analysis and reporting. Sign up for spring 2024!

Phytoplankton Weekly Reports

Year
2024
2021
2022
2023
2021-2022 Annual reports

If you’re interested in seeing reports prior to 2021, email Jasmine Maurer.

Spot Alaska’s least wanted: They’re mean, they’re five-spined, and they’re here. We’ve been tracking the invasive European green crab crawl up from the south for years. In 2022, it was detected on Annette Island, Alaska. These voracious predators disrupt native habitats and pose a serious threat to native crabs, shellfish, and salmon. Early detection and removal is the only way to reduce the severity of their impact. Three are three ways to help:

  • Molt walk: Perfect for regular walkers of the shore! All crabs shed their skeletons to grow. By collecting molts on beach walks and identifying them, you can contribute to early detection and their control. If you are close by, you can bring it to our office. If not, you can take a picture and share it with Alaska’s Invasive Species Hotline, managed by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.
  • Trap: Once a month, volunteer trappers set baited crab traps at a predetermined site. The traps soak for 24 hours and then all native crabs and bycatch are identified and measured. Early detection trapping requires training and a permit. By using the same protocol, we support the Alaska Invasive Species Partnership in its work to detect marine invasive species and understand its impact on native fish and wildlife. Sign up for a spring crab trapping training in 2024!
  • Alaska Green Crab Awareness Day! No time for regular trapping? Join us on July 19th. Stay tuned for more information on activities in 2024.

This bloom of Mesodinium rubrum was spotted with the help of community volunteers. While not harmful to humans, it can make shellfish stop eating! If you see something unusual on the coast, scoop it up and bring it to the Reserve within 24 hours.

Volunteer

Interested in participating in education, outreach, or citizen science in support of Kachemak Bay’s lands and waters? The Kachemak Bay Research Reserve may be a good fit for your interests and a great use of your time.

If you are a student or interested in becoming an intern, check out the opportunities on our education page. Otherwise, complete the form below so we can recommend opportunities to match your interests with Reserve programs and activities.

All volunteers will need to complete University of Alaska at Anchorage paperwork and will receive any project training needed. Thank you for your interest; we look forward to hearing from you!

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Groundwater in Kachemak Bay

Advise

We rely on community input to guide our work and inform our goals. The Kachemak Bay Research Reserve Community Council creates a platform for substantive and meaningful dialogue between state agencies, local governments, researchers, environmental educators, conservation groups, and community members interested in supporting the Reserve and its work.

Groundwater in Kachemak Bay

Support

The Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve is supported through a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Alaska at Anchorage.

While this partnership supports our core programs, additional funds would help us deepen and extend our support for Alaska communities. If you are interested in providing funding to support a Reserve program or activity, please contact Katherine Schake, the Reserve manager.

Groundwater in Kachemak Bay

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